MiSs Rs ArT RoOm

Welcome to our Online Art Classroom! This website shows everything happening in the art room! The students love hearing how fun, creative, and beautiful their masterpieces are! Thank you for stopping by!

Thursday, January 7, 2021

HAROLD HOLLINGSWORTH ABSTRACTIONS

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 Harold Hollingsworth Abstractions 

Learning Targets 

I can...

  • Create an original Harold Hollingsworth Abstraction using drawing techniques learned in class
  • Use shape variation (geometric organic free form), form (two dimensional, three dimensional), and value (lightness darkness) inspired by American Artist (1979-Present) Harold Hollingsworth
  • Use design techniques (gradient letter spacing grid) and design principles (contrast movement emphasis) based on Contemporary Art
  • Define Recompose (to rearrange or restore a composition)

Lesson One
Day One, Art Start

1. Cola (2020) Harold Hollingsworth

2. Read Museum Shapes by The New York Metropolitan Museum of Art

3. Discussion Questions "How does the location or context of the work affect its meaning? What are the subjects, issues, and themes important to artists working today? What role does beauty play in contemporary art? Does a work of art need to be beautiful? Why is art important? What role does art play in our society? What value is placed upon artists and their art, and why? What makes something a work of art? Is art defined by particular boundaries? IF so, what are they and how have they changed over time? What distinguishes visual art from other forms of visual communication like advertising, design, or photorealism? Who decides what a work of art means- the artist, the critic, the viewer? How does history and the passage of time affect the meaning of an artwork? What are the most important skills an artist can have?"

Lesson Activities

1.  Choose 12" X 15" Drawing Paper

2. Draw three recognizable form (letters numbers flowers) for positive space (foreground) of the abstract work

3. Draw three recognizable forms (letters numbers flowers) for the negative space (background) of the Harold Hollingsworth Abstractions 

Day Two, Art Start

1. Retrieve Harold Hollingsworth Abstractions for Assigned Tables

2. Plumb (2016) Harold Hollingsworth

3. Discussion Questions "What are the most important skills are artist can have? What materials and tools do artists use to create art today? Have the tools changed over time? Where do artists find inspiration? What is the difference between working alone and collaborating on an artwork with fabricators, audiences, or others? In addition to museums and galleries, where else can art be shown? How does the location or context of a work of art affect its meaning? What are the subjects, issues, and themes important to artists working today? What role does beauty play in contemporary art? Does a work of art need to be beautiful? Why or why not? Who decides what is beautiful?"

Lesson Activities

1. Use drawing techniques (contour line outline) to add basic shapes (geometric organic) to the positive space (foreground) of the abstract work

2. Use drawing techniques (contour line outline) to add basic shapes (geometric organic) to the negative space (background) of the abstract work

3. Use drawing techniques (contour line outline) to add details (pattern repetition form) to the Harold Hollingsworth Abstractions

Day Three, Art Start

1. Retrieve Harold Hollingsworth Abstractions for Assigned Table

2. Set Up Studio Area (glue sticks, scissors, markers)

Lesson Activities

1. Use analogous colors (red blue purple) to fill in the positive space (foreground) of the abstract work

2. Use analogous colors (green blue purple) to fill in the negative space (background) of the abstract work

3. add design details (geometric shapes, borders, patterns) to the positive space (foreground) and negative space (background) of the Harold Hollingsworth Abstractions 

Artist Examples



Student Examples

LOUISE NEVELSON INSPIRED ASSEMBLAGES

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Louise Nevelson Inspired Assemblages

Learning Targets

I can...

  • Create an original Louise Nevelson Inspired Assemblages using sculpture techniques learned in class
  • Use neutral colors (black brown gold), shape variation (geometric organic free form) and form (two dimensional three dimensional) inspired by American Sculptor (1899-1988) Louise Nevelson
  • Use assemblage techniques (layering overlapping found objects) and design principles (composition gradation proportion) based on Modern Art
  • Define Relief Sculptures (any work which projects from but which belongs to the wall or other type of background surface)

Lesson One
Day One, Art Start

1. Ancient Secrets III (Part 2) (1964) Louise Nevelson

2. Read Breaking Tradition: The Story of Louise Nevelson by Natalie Bober

3. Discussion Questions "How does a sculpture compare to a painting? How does Louise Nevelon's sculptures compare to other sculptures? Why would she paint them in a solid color? Does her work have balance, variety, and texture? Why? Did she fill the space with a variety of shapes and forms/ Does she have more negative space or positive space in her sculptures? How is Louise Nevelon's sculptures similar or different of sculptures by other artists? What did Louise Nevelson use to create her assemblages? In your opinion, why do you think that it was important for her to select and use these materials? What visual impact does color play in Nevelson's 'Dawn's Wedding Chapel IV' and 'Cascade'? Do you enjoy the work of Louise Nevelson?"

Lesson Activities 

1. Choose 12" X 15" Wooden Background

2. Use collage techniques (overlapping cropping forming) to make three dimensional objects for wooden sculptures

3. Use assemblage techniques (attaching, combining, found object) to connect all three dimensional objects of the Louise Nevelson Inspired Assemblages

Day Two, Art Start

1. Retrieve Louise Nevelson Inspired Assemblages for Assigned Table

2. Diminishing Reflection XX (1966) Louise Nevelson

3. Discussion Questions "How do you think the exposure to wood affected her career? What if her father owned a textile factory? Have you seen anything like this before? What kinds of shapes do you see? Are some of the shapes and pieces repeated? What colors do you see? Do you think this piece is monochromatic? Have you ever made anything like this? If you were to make a sculptor like this, what would you make it out of? What do you like about this sculpture?"

Lesson Activities 

1. Use addictive techniques (containers, wooden scraps, clothing pins) to add details to wooden sculptures

2. Use found objects (beads, buttons, wooden objects) to add different sizes (small, medium large) to wooden sculptures

3. Use adhesive techniques (super glue, glue bottles, string) to connect different sizes (small medium large) of the Louise Nevelson Inspired Assemblages 

Day Three, Art Start

1. Retrieve Louise Nevelson Inspired Assemblages for Assigned Tables

2. Set Up Studio Area (spray paint, tempera paint, watercolor paint)

Lesson Activities

1. Use neutral colors (black brown gold) to fill in the positive space (foreground) of the wooden sculptures

2. Use neutral colors (black brown gold) to fill in the negative space (background) of the wooden sculptures

3. Use shade (black) to add the illusion of depth within the Louise Nevelson Inspired Assemblages

Artist Examples


Student Examples

Wednesday, January 6, 2021

GARDEN GNOMES

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 Garden Gnomes

Learning Targets

I can...

  • Create an original Garden Gnomes using drawing techniques learned in class
  • Use form (two dimensional three dimensional), space (positive negative), and texture (rough smooth) inspired by German Painter (1849-1923) Heinrich Schlitt
  • Use ceramic techniques (slab coil pinch) and design principles (composition proportion balance) based on Mythology
  • Define Hand Building (using hands, fingers, and simple tools to create forms)

Lesson One
Day One, Art Start

1. The Wasp Sting (2015) Heinrich Schlitt

2. Read "Secrets Of The Gnomes" by Will Huygen

3. Discussion Questions "Where do Gnomes live? Why do Gnomes were pointed caps? Are Gnomes magic? Do Gnomes ever show themselves to humans? Do Gnomes talk to animals and plants? Is it true that Gnomes do not get along with cats? What secrets are gnomes guardians of? Where were decorative garden gnomes first created? What do garden gnomes always wear? How do garden gnomes give greetings, farewells, and goodnights? Which of the gnomes knows the mot about mankind? Where do garden gnomes come from? What is the difference between garden gnomes and regular gnomes? What do you think about garden gnomes? What do you like about garden gnomes?"

Lesson Activities

1. Add lines for proportions (beard, hair, boots) within the silhouette of the ceramic garden gnome 

2. Mold clay into basic shapes (oval face, triangle hat, circle boots) of the ceramic garden gnomes

3. Use a needle tool to draw facial features (eyelids, nostrils, ears) within the silhouette of the Garden Gnomes

Day Two, Art Start

1. Retrieve Garden Gnome for Assigned Table

2. A Traveling Gnome With His Toadstool (2005) Heinrich Schlitt

3. Discussion Questions "Why are gnomes important in mythology and folklore? What special features do gnomes have? What are gnomes a sign of? What is the hidden meaning of seeing a gnome? What are unique characteristics of gnomes? What type of gnomes are in our story? Do either or both of these gnomes live where you do? What do you notice about this work? What impact do gnomes have with in America and more widely on the Western World? Where is the light and shadow in this artwork? Does the gnome look real in this painting? Is this subject matter symbolic in any way- of what?"

Lesson Activities

1. Add facial features (nostrils, eyelids, beard) within the silhouette of the ceramic garden gnomes

2. Add details (eyebrows, patterns, pupils) to the facial features (nostrils, eyelids, beard) of the ceramic garden gnomes

3. Use modeling tools (brush grip paddle) to smooth out facial features (nostrils eyelids beard) of Garden Gnomes

Day Three, Art Start

1. Retrieve Garden Gnome for Assigned Table

2. Set Up Studio Area (simple tools, ceramic mat, air dry clay)

Lesson Activities

1. Add tempera paint to the positive space (neck head body) of the ceramic garden gnomes

2. Add tempera paint to the negative space (background) of the ceramic garden gnomes

3. Apply Gloss Finish to face proportions, facial features, and accessories of the Ceramic Garden Gnomes

Artist Examples


Student Examples

Tuesday, January 5, 2021

WILLIAM WEGMAN PHOTOMONTAGES

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 William Wegman Photomontages

Learning Targets

I can...

  • Create an original William Wegman Photomontage using drawing techniques learned in class
  • Use line types (continuous contour outline), shape variation (geometric organic free form) and value (lightness darkness) inspired by American Artist (1943-Present) William Wegman
  • Use collage techniques (overlapping cropping layering) and design principles (composition balance proportion) based on American Art
  • Define Photomontage (overlapping or rearranging photographs to create an image)

Lesson One
Day One, Art Start

1. Coach From The Cinderella Portfolio (1994) William Wegman 

2. Read "Flo & Wendell Explore" by Dial Books For Younger Readers

3. Discussion Questions "What type of dog did the artist photograph? What do artists use as motivation? What do you like about this photograph? Who or what are the Hardly Boys? How does the artist create these photographs? What do you think is the most difficult scene to photograph? How would you describe this artwork to someone? How did Wegman's skills as a photographer leave a unique mark on the television and art world? What mood could be described in this artwork? What makes Wegman's photography unique? Which two factors made 1979 a miserable time for Wegman? What does this image demonstration his skill of? What should all the photographs have? What do you like about this style?"

Lesson Activities

1. Choose 12" X 15" Drawing Paper

2. Use pencil to draw a contour line of facial proportions (eyes, nose, mouth) of animals for animal collages

3. Use pencil to add facial features (fur, wings, eyelashes) to positive space (animal) of animals for animal collages 

Day Two, Art Start

1. Retrieve William Wegman Photomontages from Assigned Table

2. Igor Or Ivan (2001) William Wegman 

3.  Discussion Questions "What portraits did you especially like or dislike? What do you think a portrait shows about your identity? Why do you identify with that particular cultural group? What do you admire about these photographs? How can you make your own portrait better after looking at other portraits? What is the difference between a portrait and a self portrait? Why is it difficult to draw a portrait? Why is the most outstanding part of your portrait? How can you use close observational skills to draw a portrait?" 

Lesson Activities

1. Add adornments (piercings tattoos hairstyle) to positive space (face nose shoulder) of animal collages

2. Add costumes (jewelry, clothing, make up) to positive space (facial features) of animal collages

3. Use black sharpie marker to outline facial features (nose mouth eyes) and clothing (costumes, hats, scarfs) of William Wegman Photomontages 

Day Three, Art Start

1. Retrieve William Wegman Photomontages from Assigned Table

2. Set Up Studio Area (scissors, glue, magazines)

Lesson Activities

1. Use multicultural colored pencils to fill in the positive space (clothing jewelry facial features) of animal collages

2. Use watercolor pencils to fill in the negative space (background landscape wallpaper) of the animal collages 

3. Use value (lightness darkness) to add shadows and highlights to the William Wegman Photomontages

Artist Examples


Student Examples

WARM AND COOL WAVES

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 Warm And Cool Waves

Learning Targets

I can...

  • Create an original Warm and Cool Waves using painting techniques learned in class 
  • Use warm/cool waves (red orange yellow; green blue purple), line types (horizontal vertical diagonal), and value (lightness darkness) inspired by American Artist (1956-Present) Robert Wyland
  • Use drawing techniques (perspective atmospheric seascape) and design principles (composition proportion balance) based on Contemporary Art
  • Define Subjective Color (colors chosen by the artist without regard to the natural appearance of the object portrayed)

Lesson One
Day One, Art Start

1. Storm (2001) Robert Wyland

2. Read The Seashore Book by Charlotte Zolotow

3. Discussion Questions "Do you think whales are a part of our natural ecosystem? How did an artist from Detroit become interested in whales? Do you think artists create the style they paint in, or are artists something of an imitator, drawing from other artists? Does hi work change your view of the world? How can we prevent countries from hunting certain species of whale? What can we do to improve water quality problems in our country? Why does the artist paint massive works of art? How can artists contribute to environmental causes? What influential individuals was the artist inspired by? What other mediums has the artist worked in? How would you define art? What does art mean to you? What do you think an artist is?"

Lesson Activities 

1. Choose 12" x 12" Painting Paper 

2. Draw foreground (bottom wave), middle ground (main wave) and background (sky clouds) of wave paintings

3. Use painting techniques (blending smudging layering) to add layers to subject matter (waves) of Warm And Cool Waves

Day Two, Art Start

1. Retrieve Warm And Cool Waves for Assigned Table

2. Warm Seas (2011) Robert Wyland

3. Discussion Questions "What factors influenced the artist as a child that impacted his art career? Who are some of his contemporaries who have influenced his art? What is the artists favorite art form? What are some characteristics of his artwork that sets it apart from other artists work? What is the symbolism found within his work? What are some indicators that prove he is an important American Contemporary artist? What are some different types of art produced at different stages in his life? What were some major influences that contributed to him becoming a great artist? What makes you think that he is a contemporary artist?" 

Lesson Activities

1. Add thin layers of paint to foreground (bottom wave), middle ground (main wave) and background (clouds sky) of the wave paintings

2. Use painting techniques (blending smudging layering) to add details (wave peaks, white foam, mist) to the wave paintings

3. Use painting techniques (blending smudging layering) to add texture (implied actual visual) to Warm And Cool Waves

Day Three, Art Start

1. Retrieve Warm And Cool Waves for Assigned Table

2. Set Up Studio Area (paint brushes, watercolor, felt tip pens) 

Lesson Activities

1. Use warm color (red orange yellow) to fill in the negative space (background) of the wave paintings

2. Use cool colors (blue purple green) to fill in the positive space (waves) of the wave paintings

3. Use tint (white) and shade (black) to add the illusion of depth within the Warm And Cool Waves

Artist Examples


Student Examples